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Folk Dance Festival

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folk dance festival - daman

The people of Daman & Diu are very fond of various forms of cultural activities and a folk dance is one of the primary celebrations out there. The socio-cultural life of Daman & Diu has a multi-faceted character as this region used to be a Portuguese colony once. One can clearly observe the cultural beauty of Diu and Daman that also represents a blend of European and Tribal elements.

It is a place which is extremely beautiful and also very significantly interesting. Drink, eat, sing and be merry is the motto of the dance festival. It is celebrated with great grandeur and pomp. It is welcomed by both the youth as well as the elderly people. People and visitors eagerly wait for this festival for it so so joyous and full of enjoyment. The dance forms associated with this festival are Mando, Verdugao and Vira. Clean roads, tribal nature, the class of the people, work, literature, art, and all are described in the dances.

folk dance festival - daman

Music and dance play a very significant role in the cultural phenomena of Daman and Diu. The metaphorical amalgamation is highly visible in the cultural dance of that region. The folk dance festival portrays the life of Diu people and the theme and dance of the song is based on eating, drinking, singing and other activities. In fact, people are so involved in dancing that sometimes they also perform dances in slow motions. The majority of the social customs and rituals are related to the Hindu region.

It is believed that these folk dances not only socially loved but also have an emotional connection with everyone who enjoys it. These folk dances to preserve the rich cultural heritage making it a perfect destination for visitors and as well as others. Even today these tribal dances are conserved well and are presented widely and also they have a sarcastic social remark which forms as an evergreen trend.

The Gowda Tribe of Goa

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The Gowda Tribe of Goa
The Gowda Tribe of Goa

Goa is known as a tiny emerald on the western coast of India. This place is widely known as a tourist destination for its sandy, clean beaches, and its rich cultural heritage. Along with the Portuguese forts and churches, ancient tribes are an integral part of their cultural heritage too. The chief tribes in Goa include Gowdas, Velips, Kunbis, Dhangars, etc. These tribes have retained their lives in their ancient ways of lifestyle even today.

One of the most ancient and the earliest tribe to have taken residence in Goa is the Gowda tribe. This tribe is found in the deep interior villages of Goa. No official record or evidence has been ever found out about their background and heritage as to where came from but their rituals and customs have a sparkling resemblance to the Gowdas from Bengal. This clan of people majorly has been following Hinduism but some have been converted by the Portuguese during their reign in Goa. But this Portuguese conversion enforcement made the community divided into three parts. The ones who practice Hindu religion worship Lord Malikkarjun who is known as a reincarnation of Lord Shiva. Though they follow all Hindu customs majorly, there is one thing they don’t follow. That is cremation after death that is followed by Hindus customarily. Gowdas bury their dead in a burial ground.

Women in Gowda Tribe
Women in Gowda Tribe

The Gowdas guard their bloodlines and ethnicity very seriously. So, it is not only the uncustomary customs, but the Gowdas have unusual marriage ethics too. This tribe is not permitted to marry outside their tribe people and is always looked upon and hoped to carry this same legacy ahead so as to maintain the cultural heritage of the tribe. Following these, it would not be out of place to mention their allowance in cross-cousin marriages. These people arrange marriages between maternal and paternal cousins.

The Gowdas have been well – appreciated for their equality in gender and stating women to be in power to take important decisions too. Women are led to have their own opinions on social, political and economic issues. As agriculture is a much sought-after occupation by them, women are given the opportunity to work with the men for the same. Their ‘equal rights for women’ policy can also be seen through the tribal laws they follow wherein one law states that, on the death of a man, his wife can inherit all his property unquestionably.

The Chenchus of Telangana

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CHENCHUS OF TELANGANA

It an aboriginal belief of the peoples of the Chenchu tribe of Telangana and Andhra Pradesh that they are descendants from the union of ‘Chenchu Laxmi’, a girl who was living under a ‘Chettu’ tree and Lord Malikarjuna.  The origin of the Chenchus is connected with Lord Malikarjuna of the Srisailam temple and have mentioned in their religious texts and temple records. Thus, they are associated with the temple in the heart of the Andhra region where they enjoy special privileges. Their sparse population (25,000 approx.) is situated in the Nallamalai forests of Andhra Pradesh in India spread over the districts of Mahaboobnagar, Kurnool, Prakasam and Guntur.

The Chenchu are a numerically small, Proto Australoid, food gathering tribe who speak a dialect of the Dravidian languages termed Chenchu. Their language is also known as Chenchucoolam, Chenchwar, Chenswar or Choncharu. Many of them also speak Telegu. Being major of Hindu belief, they worship the numerous gods and goddesses along with a few others namely- Bhawan Taru-the watcher of Chenchu and Garelamai Sama, the goddess of the forest. They depend on the forest for their daily requirements of gathering food and produce for their daily lives.chenchus of telangana

Being largely endogamous, they do not tend to marry out of specific rungs of their community dictated by the ancient Hindu system of lineage and descent called – ‘gotras’. The Chenchu identify themselves with membership with these specific gotras and have clan names. The patriarchal system dictates that the name of the bride after the marriage ceremony ‘Pelli ’which would be changed to her husbands’ and would be ‘given away’ by her maternal uncle.

Unfortunately, the tribe faces numerous problems in various sphere of life. Between the years of 1990 and 2006, the tribe was caught in the crossfire between the Maoists and the anti-Naxal police force called the Greyhounds. Forest department and wildlife conservationists of the Nagarjunasagar Srisailam Tiger Reserve (NSTR) stick to the argument that fast depleting species of tigers require an exclusive protection zone, making the residence of the Chenchu tribe suddenly unsure. Studies have documented a high prevalence of undernutrition, morbidity and mortality among Chenchu, with lower than average BMIs and numerous nutrient deficits. Women and children being the most affected having low nutrient consumption, premature delivery, low birth weight, alcoholic cirrhosis of the liver, accidents, snakebite and pulmonary tuberculosis also because of low access to health and hygiene facilities that come with high illiteracy rates and poverty. Raging alcoholism is also a huge problem for the community by ways of making liquor with indigenous ‘mahua’ flowers and access to cheap tobacco.

chenchus of telangana

With plans for rehabilitation and integration of the Chenchu tribe, the government claims to try and help the community. A community, however, which has no longing to leave the land of their ancestors. A community which distances themselves from groups of mainstream marginalised communities under the government aid. The community of the Chenchu tribe awaits peace and a chance to go back to the undisturbed solace they had generations ago.